Skip to content

World-famous Landmarks Have Changed In 100 Years

Aerial Panoramic of Skaneateles Lake and Village

Tourism increased dramatically during the Roaring Twenties due to a thriving global economy and a positive post-First World War mood. This was the first decade in which the general public could travel by plane, but only as a luxury for a select few who could afford it. Nevertheless, a lot of people started taking vacations both domestically and abroad, taking advantage of the opportunity to visit some of the most well-known sites in the world up close.

Arc de Triomphe, Paris, France:

The Arc de Triomphe is a striking structure, standing 164 feet (50 meters) tall and adorned with Neoclassical architecture. Thus, it should come as no surprise that the opulent landmark took an astounding 30 years to construct. Napoleon, I ordered the arch built in 1806, and it is located in the middle of Place de l'Etoile, often known as Star Square, because the streets there are arranged like stars. It is encircled by electric street lights in this 1929 photo; in 1878, Paris became the first city in the world to implement this technology.

Arc de Triomphe, Paris, France:

The Arc de Triomphe is a striking structure, standing 164 feet (50 meters) tall and adorned with Neoclassical architecture. Thus, it should come as no surprise that the opulent landmark took an astounding 30 years to construct. Napoleon, I ordered the arch built in 1806, and it is located in the middle of Place de l'Etoile, often known as Star Square, because the streets there are arranged like stars. It is encircled by electric street lights in this 1929 photo; in 1878, Paris became the first city in the world to implement this technology.

Hollywood sign, Los Angeles, California, USA:

Hollywood Sign - Griffith Observatory - Southern California's gateway to  the cosmos!

The Hollywood sign, which was constructed in 1923 and originally said "Hollywood land," is arguably even more famous than the actual location. Hollywood was starting to gain recognition as a center for the film industry in the 1920s, so real estate developer Harry Chandler constructed the sign to promote his brand-new, upscale residential community. A party of surveyors is pictured here in 1925, posing beneath it. Though it was only meant to be up for a year and a half, the sign has been in place for nearly a century.

Hollywood sign, Los Angeles, California, USA:

When did those final four letters disappear, then? The Hollywoodland housing development went bankrupt during the 1930s Great Depression, and sign upkeep was neglected. Almost destroyed when the sign came into city control in the middle of the 1940s, the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce chose to remove the word "land" from it instead. Then, in the 1970s, playboy tycoon Hugh Hefner and other well-known contributors paid for a full replacement. Originally from Los Angeles, this sign has come to represent Tinseltown.

New York, Times Square:

Times Square (formerly known as Longacre Square) was a mostly vacant area with a few apartment buildings as late as the 1880s. All of that, however, changed in 1904 when the neighbourhood was renamed Times Square and The New York Times erected a massive tower here for its new headquarters. The city center's status was cemented in the 1920s when West 42nd Street served as a hub for new bus and subway lines.

The Times Square in New York City:

Times Square: De 5 Mooiste Bezienswaardigheden - Droomplekken.nl

During the 1960s and 1970s, the region gained a bad image because to its association with crime and adult entertainment. By the late 1970s, it was the area getting the highest number of crime complaints in the entire city. Redevelopment projects received a lot of funding and resources starting in the 1980s. Times Square is one of the most recognizable sights in New York City, even though visitors who are often taking pictures may prefer it over the locals. It is now recognized for its colourful billboards and neon lights.

Great Sphinx of Giza, Egypt:

The 1920s saw a surge in cruise travel, opening up far-flung destinations to the world's affluent elite. And Egypt gained popularity very fast due to its numerous ancient attractions. This image from 1923 shows a group of American tourists posing with the Great Sphinx of Giza. Standing 66 feet (20 meters) tall and 240 feet (73 meters) long, this massive limestone sculpture was constructed approximately 4,500 years ago during the reign of Pharaoh Khafre.

Great Sphinx of Giza, Egypt:

The enormous monument on the Giza Plateau, next to the Great Pyramid, was modeled after the fabled sphinx, which is a lion with a human head. The body wasn't discovered until the early 1800s, when a group of about 160 men and a Genoese adventurer tried to excavate it. By the late 1930s, the sphinx had been fully excavated despite their futile efforts. Its feet are hidden in the prior photo, as you can see if you look closely.

Related Articles